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There may have been more method than madness to Sarah Palin’s and Senator Chuck Grassley’s scaring the hell out of a lot of people about mythological “death panels.”  The current debate over health-care legislation before Congress may be getting deliberately side-tracked to steer us away from finding out that what we’ll be getting is not real reform but a huge government-sponsored money grab for health industry giants!

While town-hall meetings have been filled with angry and frightened citizens, afraid that this health-care legislation will deny themselves or family members care or let them die, these people may have been badly misused by big-money interests, which Palin and Grassley may be answering to, to steer them, and the rest of us, away from the real problem with the health-care reform legislation before Congress.

HR 3200, the health-care reform bill currently under consideration, is a whopping 1,000-plus-pages monster piece of legislation.  It is a compromise measure designed to bring together all the main power houses of the health-care industry including the big insurance companies, corporate providers, and pharmaceutical companies.  These industry giants have not been without representation and / or lobbying efforts in developing this bill. (See link to NY Times article showing the major players in health-care legislation.)

One of the major features of HR 3200 – that is NOT BEING TALKED ABOUT – begins on page 167 and essentially enforces “acceptable” coverage or be taxed by the government up to 2.5% of their income.

“SEC. 401. TAX ON INDIVIDUALS WITHOUT ACCEPTABLE
11 HEALTH CARE COVERAGE.
12 (a) IN GENERAL.—Subchapter A of chapter 1 of the
13 Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by adding at
14 the end the following new part:
15 ‘‘PART VIII—HEALTH CARE RELATED TAXES
‘‘SUBPART A. TAX ON INDIVIDUALS WITHOUT ACCEPTABLE HEALTH CARE
COVERAGE.
16 ‘‘Subpart A—Tax on Individuals Without Acceptable
17 Health Care Coverage
‘‘Sec. 59B. Tax on individuals without acceptable health care coverage.
18 ‘‘SEC. 59B. TAX ON INDIVIDUALS WITHOUT ACCEPTABLE
19 HEALTH CARE COVERAGE.
20 ‘‘(a) TAX IMPOSED.—In the case of any individual
21 who does not meet the requirements of subsection (d) at
22 any time during the taxable year, there is hereby imposed
23 a tax equal to 2.5 percent of the excess of

(1) the taxpayer’s modified adjusted gross in2
come for the taxable year, over
3 ‘‘(2) the amount of gross income specified in
4 section 6012(a)(1) with respect to the taxpayer.”

With talk of dropping the public option, or government-run health plan option, this bill will force us, by law, to belly up to the insurance industry trough and pay them whatever they’re demanding, whether we can afford it or not.

This links to NY Times article showing major health-care reform players:  Key Players in the Health Care Debate – Prescriptions Blog – NYTimes.com.

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